Author Topic: New to fish - questions about my multis  (Read 719 times)

Online JarmFace

  • Brevis
  • *
    • View Profile
  • Location: Oregon
Re: New to fish - questions about my multis
« Reply #15 on: September 26, 2017, 09:47:56 AM »
@JarmFace I used a cichlid sand. My tap is really soft. pH is around 7, GH and KH are about 1-2. The sand actually helped increase my chemistry. It's just during water changes that my tap seems to dilute everything. I will try 25% per week.

I have a similar situation. My tap is 3 GH and 0 KH (I call it near RO). I buffer with cichlid sand in a bucket for a week before I introduce to my tank. Then again, my shellie tank is only 10 gallons so that's a bit more feasible.

I think that Jerry is on point with more frequent, smaller water changes.

Online jerrytheplater

  • Boulengeri
  • ****
    • View Profile
  • Location: Bloomingdale, NJ
Re: New to fish - questions about my multis
« Reply #16 on: September 26, 2017, 07:19:53 PM »
ATTRM:

Do you have NYC water? Water from the Catskills? If so, a member of my Aquatic Gardening club lives in Yonkers and has that water. If you do, that is Discus, Cardinal Tetra water. She and I have gone into quite some detail on getting her swimming pool chemistry set. Stores for pool supplies just are not prepared for her water. I keep trying to get her to convert the pool into a Discus pond. (Tongue in cheek)

If you do have that great water, I would be using both Seachem Cichlid Lake Salts and Tanganyika Buffer every water change. Water top offs could easily be straight out of the tap.
Jerry Smith
Bloomingdale, NJ

http://www.njagc.net/wp/

Offline Rupert

  • Ornatipinnis
  • ***
    • View Profile
  • Location: Missouri, U.S.
Re: New to fish - questions about my multis
« Reply #17 on: October 03, 2017, 10:38:49 AM »
Kind of curious how things are going. Did you mess around with flow patterns? If so, are your fish utilizing your tank space better? Have you made any choices about how you are going to amend your water? How did the last water change go? How are the fish doing?

This hobby has a learning curve and getting started on the right foot can make a difference in whether it feels fun and exciting or like an exercise in pure frustration. And, honestly, starting with water that is so soft and choosing to work with a really hard water fish you have kind of jumped in toward the deep end. Totally doable and nothing to be afraid of--but it does add some extra steepness to the initial learning curve. :)

I do encourage you to hang with it. Everyone starts from scratch. Everyone develops their own direction. A year from now, you may decide to keep a different kind of tank altogether. Enjoy the journey. There is much pleasure to be had from an aquarium done well. Always give yourself time to enjoy the results of your hard work. :)

 

Offline AsstToTheRegionalMgr

  • Multifasciatus
    • View Profile
  • Location: New York
Re: New to fish - questions about my multis
« Reply #18 on: October 03, 2017, 10:35:43 PM »
Hi Rupert!

I haven't messed with the flow pattern. I have the flow set high even though that prevents the fish from utilizing 1/2 of the tank. I noticed that the surface of the water gets a film even when the flow is set high. From what I've read, the film is there due to a lack of circulation, so I decided to maximize circulation to clear the water even if that means decreasing the amount of space available. Also, the flow seems less powerful now that I got a lid and my water level stays high. Maybe the fish are just set on their spots and won't move even if they can now.

Although changing water chemistry might not be necessary, I did add some baking soda cichlid salt because no matter what I did the KH and GH was so low. During a water change, I took out 25% and added an equivalent volume of water with the proper dosage of baking soda and salt and it seems to have kept the chemistry stable. Luckily, I am studying for a major exam for professional school and knowing how to do basic concentration calculations is crucial and I can now apply it to this hobby  :)

As for the fish, I think they are doing ok. My wife and I are trying to figure out their sex. One is so large that we're convinced it's a male. The others...we're not so sure. I think they're still growing. We're hoping that dozens will populate the tank so praying for a good male to female ratio.

I realized my fish are alot lighter in color. I went to 2 LFS (other than the one I purchased from) recently and their multis were alot darker. They were brownish while mine are whitish/tan. I don't know if this is an age thing or if something is wrong. Also, I noticed that my fish sometimes brush their backs against a shell and swiftly dart against the shell.

Lastly, this has been a blast for me. I did a ton of research prior to purchasing the fish so I haven't had too many surprises. Adjusting chemistry hasn't been too hard as well. The hardest part was deciding whether to alter chemistry or not. I'm still doing a ton of reading, started following some people on youtube, etc. I'm learning more each day and I think the fun part is that there are endless possibilities - the variables of size, species, water quality, etc. allow for an infinite number of projects.

I'm only a month in and I am thinking of my next project :D I've got about a dozen ideas but I live in a one bedroom apartment and I think I'll wait to see what happens with my shelldwellers longer. I'm excited!


Offline Rupert

  • Ornatipinnis
  • ***
    • View Profile
  • Location: Missouri, U.S.
Re: New to fish - questions about my multis
« Reply #19 on: October 04, 2017, 07:55:28 PM »
In your situation, really soft water with low pH and a really hard water fish that likes high pH, I do think that amending your tap parameters is the right thing to do. In terms of overall health, vibrancy and fecundity fish are better off in parameters similar to their natural environment. Less than ideal parameters that are consistent are less stressful for fish than constant fluctuations, but stable ideal parameters are arguably best. With fish and water that are at such opposite ends of the spectrum, well managed efforts to bring them closer together are, I think, a benefit to the fish. Keep up the good work. :)

Fish, in general, don't develop their full coloration until they reach adulthood. Even then, excellent water quality, an appropriate quality diet, and low stress levels can all bring out the very best in fish coloration. Genetics will also play a role. Your fish may well still be juvenile and need some more time to color up. One thing to be careful about is knowing the difference between multis and similis. They are very similar, but multis are tan with brown stripes and similis are brown with tan stripes. I've seen articles on the internet by experienced aquarists that had the wrong fish pictured. It can happen. I wonder if the brown multi you saw at the fish store was actually a similis. Just a thought.

As far as darting or brushing against a shell, this is often a behavior used to mark territory. You'll see this behavior in other fish as well. However, it can also be seen if a fish has ich for example. But don't rely on it as the sole evidence of disease. My multis, especially the dominant males, flash against shells all the time.

Sounds like you are hooked :) already. Been around the hobby for over three decades and I still enjoy all the opportunities to learn and all the challenges to conquer. It really can be wonderfully rewarding.