Author Topic: Basics for neolamprologus multifasciatus  (Read 166 times)

Offline sulemanibnmoosa

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Basics for neolamprologus multifasciatus
« on: October 09, 2017, 05:44:31 AM »
Im sure this has been covered

Can someone simply write down the basics eg:

Tempertaure
PH etc
Suleman ibn Moosa
18.4 imperial gallon (22.190 US gallons) tank (Multi's)
16 imperial gallon tank with (Tetras)

Offline Rupert

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Re: Basics for neolamprologus multifasciatus
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2017, 12:27:39 PM »
You're right. Most profiles of these fish include recommended water parameters. Ideally, hard water with an alkaline pH. In this instance, the specific number is less helpful than the range. You could target the specific parameters of Lake Tanganyika--but, frankly, folks even argue about the specific numbers in the Lake, though the limited range is agreed. Plenty of people keep Tanganyikans in water that is more average in both hardness and pH. I don't encourage anyone to keep them in water that's at the low end of either parameter, however. The golden hobby standard of 78F will do your multis just fine. Though I've kept them as low as 73-74 (as a result of seasonal ambient room temperature changes, so very slow and gradual) and it didn't seem to bother them in the least. 

Offline sulemanibnmoosa

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Re: Basics for neolamprologus multifasciatus
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2017, 02:37:00 AM »
I am currently cycling my tank and I have the tempertaure set at 26c is that too high?

The water from the tap is Soft hard water which should be fine, the exact parameters shall be added tonight when I test again! I have forgotten them. I dont want to use buffers because its not something you can manage very well, I try and keep it simple to be honest?
Suleman ibn Moosa
18.4 imperial gallon (22.190 US gallons) tank (Multi's)
16 imperial gallon tank with (Tetras)

Offline Rupert

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Re: Basics for neolamprologus multifasciatus
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2017, 11:26:25 AM »
26C is right on target. :)

Online jerrytheplater

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Re: Basics for neolamprologus multifasciatus
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2017, 08:50:53 PM »
I am currently cycling my tank and I have the tempertaure set at 26c is that too high?

The water from the tap is Soft hard water which should be fine, the exact parameters shall be added tonight when I test again! I have forgotten them. I dont want to use buffers because its not something you can manage very well, I try and keep it simple to be honest?

Buffers are not really hard to use. I just add them when I do water changes. I am interested in what your test results show because "Soft hard water" is confusing to me. Remember, buffers control pH. Cichlid Salts control Total Hardness.
Jerry Smith
Bloomingdale, NJ

http://www.njagc.net/wp/

Offline Rupert

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Re: Basics for neolamprologus multifasciatus
« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2017, 04:27:30 PM »
I don't want to read too much into what you said, sulemanibnmoosa, but Jerry makes a great point. Buffers and additives--when used and managed well--aren't really a problem. But sometimes life gets full and the time, attention, and effort it takes to properly amend and monitor water parameters just doesn't happen. That's when undesired fluctuations happen. There's a variety of soft water fish I'd like to keep and spawn, but I'm just not interested at this point in my life in undertaking a long-term commitment to amend my water to suit them. I recently had work done on my well and they put chlorine down the well when they finished. Sounds silly, but I can't wait till I can go back to just turning on the tap without having the treat for chlorine. As you said, it's best to just be honest with ourselves about what we're willing and able to do.