Author Topic: Breeding Multifasciatus  (Read 5521 times)

Offline yugerg

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Breeding Multifasciatus
« on: June 08, 2016, 08:40:26 PM »
Hello Everyone,

I am brand new to this forum. Thank you for approving me btw!

I got 9 multies about 5-6 weeks ago from a friend to start a colony. They are in 10G with 13 or so shells, a few rocks and good 1.5" of crushed corals.
PH is near 8, but usually a bit lower as my water is soft and corals can only do so much.. I do 50% water change weekly due to the size of the tank.
I have a ton of tanks, so if you feel that it's too small for them please let me know..

So far only one pair had spawned and the fry is about 3 weeks old. They grow very slow despite water changes and good feeding that includes: first bites,
BBS and micro worms. Do they grew slow in general or is it my setup? None of other pairs are spawning, unless they are and I just didn't see the fry yet.

I would appreciate any input or advise on my setup.

Thank you!
Gene

Online jerrytheplater

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Re: Breeding Multifasciatus
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2016, 10:13:48 PM »
Your Multies will fill any tank you put them in over time. If you have more tank space, the bigger the better. Start up your largest tank and fill it with Multies.

My fry don't really survive in my tank because of the Synodontis lucipinnis I have in with them. Only a few survive from each spawn. I don't pamper my fry, but do ensure the food pellets fall in the shell beds. The fry have to pick on the pellets.

I guess I have never paid attention to growth rates, so I really can't help you there.
Jerry Smith
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Offline yugerg

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Re: Breeding Multifasciatus
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2016, 08:15:11 AM »
Thank you for the information! I would like to build a bigger colony, so I will not be introducing any other fish that could potentially eat the fry, at least for now.
I can move them into at least a 20 long for now. I have larger tanks, but most of them are on a taller side and as I understand these guys prefer larger footprint
rather than hight?

Thank you again,
Gene

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Re: Breeding Multifasciatus
« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2016, 10:46:01 AM »
More fish you want?  Get more shells.  They like shells on top of shells to make tiny spaces between.  Sometimes the best way to view fry is thru the bottom glass after they clear away sand to make a pit!  Not many tank stands make it easy to view from below.  I was considering mounting a slanted mirror to be able to keep from straining my dang neck!  Ha!
fish keeper of 37 yrs
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...by the glow of fish tank lights

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Re: Breeding Multifasciatus
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2016, 09:39:33 PM »
Bottom area is what counts. Depth is just dilution volume.
Jerry Smith
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Offline yugerg

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Re: Breeding Multifasciatus
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2016, 10:21:40 PM »
Thank you all for the info. I will move them to a tank with larger foot print and add some shells.

Offline yugerg

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Re: Breeding Multifasciatus
« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2016, 09:15:20 PM »
I haven't moved these guys to a bigger tank yet, but I now have 2 batches of fry from the same couple while other couples aren't doing much. Is this strange?

Gene

Offline Rupert

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Re: Breeding Multifasciatus
« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2016, 12:01:53 PM »
I still consider myself a newb to multies and their behavior, so I can't really say if yours are acting outside the norm given their conditions. Did you add more shells to their current tank? If not, I'd definitely add more. I started off with 12 young fish and have what I believe are at least two males. One male has claimed an area that's at least 6 or 7 inches square and he rules over at least 15 shells and the fish that are in them. The other male has claimed an area that's a bit smaller with like 10 shells. My understanding is that male multies stake a claim to as many shells as are in a territory they can defend. So I'm thinking that it's possible your dominant male is running the whole show. But male multies will also entertain multiple females at the same time and are not strictly monogamous breeders, so....I'd add more shells and try to separate them into 2 or 3 groups with a bit of empty space between or some kind of clear territory marker like a rock. That might instigate a change in the action.

Also, it never hurts to question assumptions. Are all the fish sexually mature? Did your friend get you started with a couple known breeders and some juveniles? Unless all the fish are known to be adults, you may just be dealing with some younger fish that still need to mature and get into breeding condition. Unlike a guppy, for example, that can be born and start breeding in three or four months--Tanganyikan cichlids take far longer to reach sexual maturity.

If you still have that thirsty 20long sitting around, I'd be tempted to try them in the bigger tank as well. You mentioned wanting to enjoy them as a larger colony. The more square footage the better when it comes to accommodating the territory needs of multiple adult males. They may be small, but offering some elbow room can't possibly hurt especially if you already have the tank and the space.

Offline yugerg

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Re: Breeding Multifasciatus
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2016, 11:08:00 PM »
Hi Rupert,

Thank you for responding to my post. I think you are right about the number of shells and territory. I only have 12 shells for 9 adults in a 10 g tank, and now that one of the pairs produced 3 batches of babies, I have around 30 fry of 3 sizes. Even for such a small fish I am really pushing it with 10 gallons. I will be moving the adults to either 20L or 30L tank (What's your though on a preferable size?)

I may leave the fry in the 10g for a while, because catching those would be a real pain. Once they grow up some I can also move them to either same or another larger tank.
I am sure that the adults I got were all sexually mature, because the pair that spawned several times is actually a smaller pair than the rest.

Thank you,
Gene


I still consider myself a newb to multies and their behavior, so I can't really say if yours are acting outside the norm given their conditions. Did you add more shells to their current tank? If not, I'd definitely add more. I started off with 12 young fish and have what I believe are at least two males. One male has claimed an area that's at least 6 or 7 inches square and he rules over at least 15 shells and the fish that are in them. The other male has claimed an area that's a bit smaller with like 10 shells. My understanding is that male multies stake a claim to as many shells as are in a territory they can defend. So I'm thinking that it's possible your dominant male is running the whole show. But male multies will also entertain multiple females at the same time and are not strictly monogamous breeders, so....I'd add more shells and try to separate them into 2 or 3 groups with a bit of empty space between or some kind of clear territory marker like a rock. That might instigate a change in the action.

Also, it never hurts to question assumptions. Are all the fish sexually mature? Did your friend get you started with a couple known breeders and some juveniles? Unless all the fish are known to be adults, you may just be dealing with some younger fish that still need to mature and get into breeding condition. Unlike a guppy, for example, that can be born and start breeding in three or four months--Tanganyikan cichlids take far longer to reach sexual maturity.

If you still have that thirsty 20long sitting around, I'd be tempted to try them in the bigger tank as well. You mentioned wanting to enjoy them as a larger colony. The more square footage the better when it comes to accommodating the territory needs of multiple adult males. They may be small, but offering some elbow room can't possibly hurt especially if you already have the tank and the space.

Offline Rupert

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Re: Breeding Multifasciatus
« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2016, 10:35:17 AM »
I had a nice, thoughtful, long reply drafted. Hit the preview button only to realize that my login had expired and the whole thing went poof. Ugh. :)

So, the TL;DR of the original post was that both the 20L and 30L would be great in my opinion. Only drawback to the 30L is the height which will be under-utilized as swimming space by multies. Think the 30L is pretty much the same height as the 40B (which is what I have my multies in) and the only time they rise to mid way or above is during feeding. Otherwise, they pretty much work the bottom third. If that's the kind of thing you'd find visually frustrating, go with the 20L.

As far as keeping fry in the 10 and possibly introducing them to the larger tank when they get bigger...I don't know at what point it might become difficult to try and re-introduce them to the established colony. I suspect there are strategies to smooth the transition, but I don't have any experience with that yet. Just something that crossed my mind as a consideration.

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Re: Breeding Multifasciatus
« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2016, 09:49:59 PM »
Get your 20 Long started. Get four or five times as many shells for them.
Jerry Smith
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Offline yugerg

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Re: Breeding Multifasciatus
« Reply #11 on: July 25, 2016, 03:57:18 PM »
Rupert,

Thank you for your ongoing support :) Sorry you lost your original pre-post. I may just play safe and move them all at once. I am thinking if I do decide on a 30G, I may stock up some cavy rocks almost to the surface, so they can utilize the upper space as well. I am just thinking 30G may give me a bit more chemical stability in the tanks. With 10G I replace 50% of water weekly and would like to do 20% or so as with the rest of my tanks.

jerrytheplater,

Thank you for your response as well, I will order another 3 or so dozen of shells for the new tank.

Gene

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Re: Breeding Multifasciatus
« Reply #12 on: August 05, 2016, 08:24:07 PM »
Gene

Multies will not use the upper space in a rock pile. They always stay near the bottom. One way to get them out of their shells is to place the shell on something off of the substrate by 6 or more inches. When they come out of the shell, they will dive for the bottom and abandon the shell. They are not comfortable up top.
Jerry Smith
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Offline yugerg

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Re: Breeding Multifasciatus
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2016, 08:41:20 AM »
Thank you, Jerrytheplater, all usefull info. I am going for larger footprint.

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Re: Breeding Multifasciatus
« Reply #14 on: August 25, 2016, 08:36:06 PM »
Did you see the 50 gallon frag tank by Zoomed? 48" long x 24" wide x 8" tall. Vicmacki posted his Multi tank. Really nice. http://www.shelldwellers.com/index.php?topic=7576.0
Jerry Smith
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