Author Topic: Shellie Newbie  (Read 362 times)

Offline PineapplesAus

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Shellie Newbie
« on: March 20, 2017, 04:23:41 AM »
I'm trying to work out the best flow rate for my multies.
 
I have 15 in 120L (30 Gallons) with a large blue planet internal filter and a small Hopar internal filter to help move the water around for no dead spots.
 
I know they prefer low flow but I need to run the pump at full capacity to get filtration right and keep the water on the surface moving.
 
If I try to restrict the flow (putting extra filter floss in the filter) it doesn't generate enough flow to move the water on top of the tank so some of the food just end up floating around.
 
I've had them for about a month now with no luck spawning yet so any tips to help get them to spawn would be great too.
 
I've been doing lots of water changes 20% to try to induce spawning but no luck yet maybe I need to leave them alone for a while.

Also I read about adding Epsom salts, marine salt and bicarb soda to help with nutrients is it necessary for breeding? Or just personal preference?
 
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Online jerrytheplater

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Re: Shellie Newbie
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2017, 06:37:44 PM »
If your Multi's are not mature they will not spawn. I only was able to see one Multi in your photo and it looked pretty small. They just might not be old enough to spawn yet.Be patient. These guys will over run your tank after a while.

Water chemistry: Do you know anything about your water you are using in this tank? What is the Total or General Hardness, Magnesium Hardness if you have the test kit (both Hach and LaMotte make a kit that allows you to split your General Hardness into Calcium and Magnesium Hardness.) and Alkalinity? pH is good to know too. You must have a commercial salt mix that will simulate Lake Tanganyika. Seachem makes Cichlid Lake Salt, which is really great.

Epsom salts add Magnesium Sulfate, it is good to use. Marine salts add way too many chlorides-I would not use them. Na Bicarbonate is great to raise the Alkalinity, or buffering capacity or KH. Lake Tanganyika water has an approximately 3.5:1 Mg:Ca ratio. My tap water in the US in New Jersey has a much lower ratio. Very little Magnesium is naturally in our water. I use Cichlid Lake Salt.

Floating food: try soaking the food for a few minutes in tank water before feeding it to make it sink faster. What are you feeding your Multi's?

Jerry Smith
Bloomingdale, NJ

http://www.njagc.net/wp/

Online Miles44

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Re: Shellie Newbie
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2017, 09:25:43 PM »
I agree with what Jerry said.  They do look quite young.  Give them time, keep them well feed, and provide them with the best water quality you can and they will be spawning in no time.  Also if all the sand in the tank has been moved that way by the multies that is a good sign as well.

Offline PineapplesAus

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Shellie Newbie
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2017, 09:39:09 PM »
Thanks for the advice.

My PH is a stable 8 as the sand and rock help buffer it.

KH is 5
Temp 28.5c
They do shift the sand around all the time constantly battling for territory it's great to watch.

I'll have to find some cichlid lake salt I'm in Australia so a little bit limited to what we have here but I'm sure most places will stock the seachem stuff.

My test kits are API I'll have to try to find something here that can split it I didn't realise that you could actually do that.


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Online jerrytheplater

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Re: Shellie Newbie
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2017, 05:06:57 PM »
You don't really need to test for Ca and Mg, but it's nice to do it. The Hach kits are in the $60-80 US dollar range. If you buy your water from a public water system, they may be able to give you a really good idea of your water composition. Try it. Do any of your local fish stores do water testing? How about water treatment companies, those that sell softeners and filtration systems. They may know your local water.

I'd be surprised if you can't find some type of water chemistry salt like Seachem's products down under.

Moving sand: I've had mine pile up the sand over 7 inches against one of the glass panes. They really do love to dig. Good of Miles to notice that. I didn't think of that.

Cheers Mate.
Jerry Smith
Bloomingdale, NJ

http://www.njagc.net/wp/